Blow the stink off.

July 14, 2013
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Grandfather Davis possible originator of the saying.

When I was a kid my Dad would always be telling us to, “Go outside and blow the stink off”.

Every family has it sayings I guess. That was one of my father’s favorites. I tried for years to find out what the hell it meant, and second where in God’s name he ever came up with it.

He’d always say it to us kids. I think he’d use it whenever he got tired of us being in the house. It didn’t matter that there was a monsoon rain or the blizzard of the century happening outside, Dad’d direct that at us and then he’d get up and walk away. He never said it to our Mom, or anyone else only us kids.

As kids we actually got the part about going outside, but the “blow the stink off” part? Well I knew I didn’t smell because I showered that morning. I also knew I hadn’t farted, at least most of the time that wasn’t my transgression. Hell if it was the farts he did more of that than we did. Why didn’t he go outside and blow the stink off?

Now after many years I find myself using on my kids. I still don’t know what it means. I did find out where he picked it up. Turns out his father used it on him and his four brothers. Guess what? None of them ever knew exactly what it meant either.

The best interpretation I’ve ever have been able to come up with is this. Go outside meant to leave the house and go play outside where you wouldn’t be bothering him.

My interpretation of the “blow the stink off” is to get some fresh air. It’s a hell of a weird way to say it, but that’s the only way I can put a meaning to that phrase.

Where it came from originally I’m afraid is lost in the mists of time and family roots.

 


Carefree Childhood – Life Was Good

January 26, 2010

I spent my childhood in a small town of around 1,000 persons. Summer days were idyllic. Riding bikes all over, playing, or lying around. Collecting soda bottles, cashing them in for 2c each, taking the 25 or 30c to the variety store. Buying a comic book, bottle of pop (soda), bubble gum, and chips. Heading for the nearest large shade tree. Reading comic books and dining with good friends for hours.

Climbing trees in vacant lots. Making forts in the upper branches of large leafy trees. Life was good.

Serial killers, perverts, pedophiles? Who the heck heard of those in the 1950’s. Carefree was the byword in those days. We knew what time to go home in for lunch or supper. My friends and I policed ourselves. The freedom we had amazes me to this day.  No wonder we didn’t want to grow up and take responsibility.


Kid Being a Brat – Mail ‘Em Away

August 10, 2009

LetterCarrierChild1913This is a photo from the National Postal Museum showing a child posing with a letter carrier in 1913.  (photographer unidentified, Smithsonian Institute, Collection: U.S. Postal Employees)

At this time you could legally mail children. It was actually done several times. Postage stamps were attached to their clothing and the children rode with railway and city carriers to their destination.

When the Post Office Department found out this was occurring, they issued a regulation to prevent “the sending of children in the mail”.

There are definitely times when I’d like to mail mine away, but with today’s postal rates it would bankrupt me.


On Being Computer Literate

July 27, 2009

OliviaComputer2009This is Olivia, one of the twins. She’s five and is becoming adept at using the computer. She learned to use the mouse and keyboard at three.  Although she plays games. It’s taught her how to load programs, read menus, and click and point with the mouse.

Some of the games she enjoys the most are Surf’s Up, Barbie’s Horse Adventure, and some others related to princesses. She and her sister also have Nintendo DS hand-held gamers and have learned to play various kid adventure games.

All of this in my mind is a good thing. These skills will come in handy later when using other apps and the internet.

A short story to illustrate how far kids have come.
I was in a dentist’s office. The phone rang and the receptionist called for a six or seven year old patient, we’ll call him Johnny. Johnny took the call which I couldn’t help but overhear. He described in detail how to save and print a WordPerfect document. Seems it was his mother calling to ask him for help. He then hung up and said aloud, “My mom, I’m still training her to use the computer.”

Needless to say I felt kind of inadequate even though I knew how to use the computer. I knew exactly what some kid in grade one knew.


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